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A survey should be made before purchasing land, when dividing any parcel of land or when adjusting tract boundaries, and prior to the construction of any improvements on property.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. What is a Land Survey?
2. Who can prepare a Boundary Survey of my Land?
3. How much will it cost to have my land surveyed?
4. What information will my Land Surveyor need?
5. Who pays for a Boundary Survey?
6. I want to subdivide and build on my property and the Planning Department told me that I need to have it "platted." What do I do?
7. What is a Flood Zone and how can I tell if my property is in one?
8. When I bought my house, I was required by the bank to pay for flood insurance. I believe my ground is high enough and will not flood. Is there a way I can remove the requirement for flood insurance?
9. What is the Land Surveyor going to provide me after my Boundary Survey is finished?
10. Do you have GPS survey equipment?

 

 

1. What is a Land Survey?
A Land Survey is a highly technical and complex service utilizing the Science of Geomatics and the Art of applying the proper application of real property law as it relates to Deed interpretation.

 

2. Who can prepare a Boundary Survey of my Land?
Only a Professional Land Surveyor licensed by the Indiana State Board of Registration for Land Surveyors is legally authorized to practice Land Surveying in the State of Indiana. In general, a Land Survey should be made before purchasing real property, when dividing any parcel of land for sale, and prior to the construction of any improvements on your property. The services of a Land Surveyor today will cost less in time and money than the cost of moving improvements or defending a lawsuit later.  

 

3. How much will it cost to have my land surveyed?
This is probably the most frequently asked question. The cost of a survey depends on several variables: the size of the property; the type of property; the type of survey being done; the purpose of the survey; the number and size of improvements on the property; vegetation on the property and the terrain of the property. The best way to get a cost estimate for your particular property is to visit the Services section of this site and familiarize yourself with the different types of surveys we can provide. Then, we invite you set up an appointment for a free consultation with one of our Surveyors. They can tailor a survey to meet your specific needs.

 

4. What information will my Land Surveyor need?
If you have personal information or documents regarding the history of your property, please provide us with copies. Documents might include a previously completed boundary survey, Abstract of Title, Title Insurance policy, property deeds, property maps, easement descriptions, and boundary / easement agreements. For surveys involving the placement and location of manmade structures or improvements, a set of certified plans from your Architect or Engineer will be needed.

We recommend that you have a Title Search prepared in conjunction with your Survey. If provided with a Title Search, we can note easements or other encumbrances of record that may effect your property on the Plat of Survey.

You will also need to provide the Surveyor with some idea of what you wish to accomplish or who has suggested you need a survey - this will give the surveyor an idea of the type of survey you may require.

 

5. Who pays for a Boundary Survey?
Like most things in real estate, payment for the survey may be negotiated between the buyer and the seller.  Payment for other types of surveys is usually the responsibility of the person requesting the survey.

 

6. I want to subdivide and build on my property and the Planning Department told me that I need to have it "platted." What do I do?
Most Planning Law provides that anyone laying out a subdivision have prepared and approved by the appropriate local government, a plat.  A plat is a legal map of the property adopted by the owner and approved by the local Planning Department and other applicable Government Units. Once a plat is approved and recorded in the County Recorders Office, the lot number, block number and plat name becomes the official legal description of the property. Even if your property is platted, you may not be able to build or improve it if you own more than one lot or partial lots that adjoin. The Planning Department may require a re-plat to combine your properties into one whole lot if you wish to construct a building or other improvement on more than one of the parcels. Contact us and we will be happy to assist you.

 

7. What is a Flood Zone and how can I tell if my property is in one?
A flood zone is an area shown as a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) published by The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for a particular community. These areas are darkly shaded on the FIRM. Property which lies in a SFHA has a 1 percent chance of being flooded in any given year. It is important to remember that this does not mean that the property will only flood once every 100 years. It means that the area has a 1 in 100 chance of being flooded in any year. According to FEMA, over the 30-year life of a typical mortgage, there is at least a 26 percent chance that property in a SFHA will be flooded.

 

8. When I bought my house, I was required by the bank to pay for flood insurance. I believe my ground is high enough and will not flood. Is there a way I can remove the requirement for flood insurance?
Yes. If your property meets certain requirement standards established by FEMA, they will issue a letter stating that your bank is not required to collect flood insurance. If your property does not meet those requirement standards, we can prepare an elevation certificate that may be able to lower the premiums you pay for flood insurance.

 

9. What is the Land Surveyor going to provide me after my Boundary Survey is finished?
By Indiana Law the Land Surveyor must provide you with a certified Surveyors Report and a drawing that details your Survey. In most cases that drawing must be recorded in the County Recorders Office for future availability and reference. Your Boundary corner markers, which were found in place, should be uncovered. Missing boundary corner markers must be set by the Surveyor and identified with the Surveyors State Registration number attached. Visible stakes, where possible, need to be set next to the corner markers found in place or set so you can easily find them on completion of the survey.

 

10. Do you have GPS survey equipment?
Yes we do. We also have Robotic and Total Station Survey equipment we use as field conditions require when conducting your Survey.

 

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